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Mangrove projects


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This page lists nature conservation projects that (among other things) protect mangroves. For an overview of all our nature projects, see our nature web page.

Mangrove projects
The pristine forests of Papua, Indonesia
Asmat Coastal Wetland, Papua, Indonesië, 2015-2018

Conserving the biodiversity of the Cacheu Mangroves Natural Park, Guinea-Bissau
Conserving the biodiversity of the Cacheu Mangroves Natural Park, Guinea-Bissau, 2015-2018

Scaling up capabilities for Effective rehabilitation and conservation of mangroves, Philippines
Scaling up capabilities for Effective rehabilitation and conservation of mangroves, Philippines, 2017-2018

Restored mangroves around a shrimp farm in Batangas, Verde Island Passage, Philippines
Mangrove Rehabilitation, Verde Island Passage, Philippines, 2014-2017

Supporting effective recovery of mangroves, Philippines
Effective restoration of mangroves, Philippines, 2014-2015

Sustainable development of Mangrove areas, Aguégués Commune, Benin
Sustainable development of Mangrove areas, Aguégués Commune, Benin, 2011-2013

A 1.5 metre Napoleon fish. These special coral fish are captured alive and then kept in the aquaria of very chic restaurants. Sometimes ten thousand square metres of coral are poisoned by cyanide to stun just one fish, after which the divers haul the stunned animal up between the coral into a mobile aquarium.
Sustainable Finance for Networks of Marine Protected Areas, Coral Triangle, 2012

harvesting manioc (cassava)
Sustainable manioc cultivation, Ingoré, Guinea Bissau, 2010-2012

improved sustainable rice cultivation, Sangaréyah Bay, Guinée Bissau, 2010-2012
Improved sustainable rice cultivation, Sangaréyah Bay, Guinée Bissau, 2010-2012

Vegetable gardens near the wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali
Sustainable management of wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali, 2010-2011

Fishing village, Murciellagos Bay, The Philippines
Ecosystem Management for the Murciellagos Bay, Philippines, 2007-2009

10% improved coral cover measured in Lamit Bay at the end of the project (july 2010)
Sustainable management of the biodiversity in the Lamit Bay, Philippines, 2007-2010

Dungonab Bay Marine National Park
Dungonab Bay and Sanganeb Atoll Marine National Park, Sudan, 2007-2009

Sustainable vegetable growing
Sustainable management of wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali, 2007-2009

Projectdetails
Wereld Natuur Fonds Asmat Coastal Wetland, Papua, Indonesië, 2015-2018
Coastal Wetland Asmat, Papua, Indonesia, 2015-2018 WWF Netherlands is part of the WWF, the world's largest and most well-known nature conservation organisation, operating in over 100 countries from offices in 60 countries, including Indonesia. This project aims to protect and encourage the sustainable use of mangrove forests along the south western coast of Asmat and Mimika districts in Papua, Indonesia. The government and local people particularly lack the knowledge to prevent the large-scale disappearance of mangrove forests in the future. For this reason, WWF Indonesia is mapping the area to indicate sensitive and degraded areas, which will serve as the basis for management plans and to teach the local population to monitor developments using geotagging. Seven community groups are being trained to restore and sustainably use an 80 hectare area of mangroves. In addition, the WWF is making sure that environmental education is incorporated into the curriculum so that children learn about the value of mangrove areas.

The Turing Foundation is making this possible by donating €162,500 (of which €50,000 in 2017). see also: Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
The pristine forests of Papua, Indonesia
The pristine forests of Papua, Indonesia


Wetlands International Conserving the biodiversity of the Cacheu Mangroves Natural Park, Guinea-Bissau, 2015-2018
Wetlands International is the global not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the conservation and restoration of wetlands, their resources and biodiversity. Their work in West Africa is focused, amongst other things, on the protection of mangrove areas. Wetlands wants to protect the mangrove nature park Cacheu in Guinea-Bissau by improving the running of the park, restoring this important buffer zone and encouraging sustainable use. In addition to strengthening the park management's capacity, Wetland is working with seven local communities to restore 200 hectares of mangrove forest, and teaching better rice production techniques to prevent further felling of mangrove areas. More understanding is needed about the ecological value and current threats, as well as more community involvement. Communities help the park management directly with conservation by restoring degraded areas and reducing pressure that is exerted on the environment by adopting sustainable alternatives, like improved rice cultivation techniques.

The Turing Foundation makes this initiative possible with a contribution of €350,000 (of which €75,000 in 2017).

Conserving the biodiversity of the Cacheu Mangroves Natural Park, Guinea-Bissau
Conserving the biodiversity of the Cacheu Mangroves Natural Park, Guinea-Bissau


Zoological Society of London Scaling up capabilities for Effective rehabilitation and conservation of mangroves, Philippines, 2017-2018
The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) connects science, nature conservation organisations and people on the ground in order to contribute as effectively as possible to nature conservation. It has conservation projects in more than 50 countries, including since 2007 the Philippines.

Since super-typhoon Haiyan in November 2013, there has been increased interest in mangroves and coastal protection in the Philippines. In 2014/2015 the Turing Foundation supported ZSL's training programme to accelerate the transfer of knowledge about proven effective restoration and protection methods. In 2016 ZSL wants to further increase capacity in the Philippines by training an additional 300 trainers and increasing national awareness of the importance of mangroves. This will be done by means of research and raising awareness by organising a third national conference and giving an 'award' for the best mangrove forest.

The Turing Foundation is donating 165,000 to this project (about 50% of the total budget, of which € 115,000 in 2017). see also: Zoological Society of London: other projects
Scaling up capabilities for Effective rehabilitation and conservation of mangroves, Philippines
Scaling up capabilities for Effective rehabilitation and conservation of mangroves, Philippines


Conservation International Mangrove Rehabilitation, Verde Island Passage, Philippines, 2014-2017
For more than 25 years Conservation International has been doing valuable work protecting nature, and involving politicians, policy makers, business and society in these efforts. Conservation International wants to restore 665 hectares of mangrove swamps, together with the local Filipino population, on the islands of Mindoro and Marinduque by replanting them. Local communities and the government are being given courses to learn about nature conservation, which will result in the better management and monitoring of at least another 1,000 hectares of mangrove and coastal areas. This capacity building and the creation of favourable political conditions are laying the groundwork for the sustainable management of mangroves in the area.

The Turing Foundation is contributing € 320,000 towards the work on Mindoro (of which € 100,000 in 2016). This contribution will be used, amongst other things, to restore and sustainably protect 165 hectares of mangroves.

Restored mangroves around a shrimp farm in Batangas, Verde Island Passage, Philippines
Restored mangroves around a shrimp farm in Batangas, Verde Island Passage, Philippines


Zoological Society of London Effective restoration of mangroves, Philippines, 2014-2015
In addition to two major zoos, the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) has a renowned science and conservation department. There has been increased interest in mangroves and coastal protection in the Philippines since typhoon Haiyan in November 2013. For this reason, ZSL wants to accelerate the transfer of knowledge about proven effective methods to restore and protect mangroves by, among other things, organising a training programme for 100 trainers and a national conference on the subject. Two coastal areas on the island of Panay are being established as demonstration sites, where knowledge can be applied in practice and the results can be directly monitored.

In 2014 the Turing Foundation is contributing € 70,000 towards the training of trainers and knowledge transfer to stakeholders, in order to effectively restore the Philippines' mangroves. see also: Zoological Society of London: other projects
Supporting effective recovery of mangroves, Philippines
Supporting effective recovery of mangroves, Philippines


CARE Nederland Sustainable development of Mangrove areas, Aguégués Commune, Benin, 2011-2013
Care International is an international aid agency. This project wants to enable structural coastal management by protecting and replanting mangroves in the Vallée du Couffo and Vallée de l'Ouémé in Benin, where we're also working with the AQUADED organisation through IUCN NL. The ecological importance has recently been acknowledged by the Ramsar convention. An important part of the project concerns the establishment of food security and creating alternative income for a community that's entirely dependent on the mangrove forests and this coastal area.

From 2011-2013, the Turing Foundation will be donating € 160,000 to this project (€ 60.000 in 2013). see also: Other projects in focus country Benin
Sustainable development of Mangrove areas, Aguégués Commune, Benin
Sustainable development of Mangrove areas, Aguégués Commune, Benin


Wereld Natuur Fonds Sustainable Finance for Networks of Marine Protected Areas, Coral Triangle, 2012
The World Wildlife Federation has established a foundation for the identification and management of protected marine areas in the Coral Triangle, which consist of 50,000 km2 of coral reefs, 50,000 km2 of mangrove forests, and breeding grounds and migration routes of important fish species in 500,000 km2 of open water.

The foundation helps to bridge budget gaps, until the local governments have their financial situations in order. The foundation is also able to offer immediate help should there be urgent needs in the protected areas.

The Turing Foundation contributes € 600,000 to this foundation. see also:
      The Coral Triangle Initiative
      Donation for Coral Protection (EZNC)
  Dr. Lida Pet Soede over het Coral Triangle Initiative (Television)
      The Coral Triangle Initiative (WWF website)
      Wereld Natuur Fonds: other projects
A 1.5 metre Napoleon fish. These special coral fish are captured alive and then kept in the aquaria of very chic restaurants. Sometimes ten thousand square metres of coral are poisoned by cyanide to stun just one fish, after which the divers haul the stunned animal up between the coral into a mobile aquarium.
A 1.5 metre Napoleon fish. These special coral fish are captured alive and then kept in the aquaria of very chic restaurants. Sometimes ten thousand square metres of coral are poisoned by cyanide to stun just one fish, after which the divers haul the stunned animal up between the coral into a mobile aquarium.


Acção para o DesenvolvimentoIUCN Nederland Sustainable manioc cultivation, Ingoré, Guinea Bissau, 2010-2012
Apart from rice, the most important food plants in Guinea-Bissau are manioc, beans and sorghum. Local organisation Acção para o Desenvolvimento promotes the sustainable production of these plants to help land improvement. Pesticides are being replaced by environmentally friendly pest and weed control methods, so nature - especially the important mangroves - can recuperate. A total of 160 farmers from eight villages will be trained in sustainable production. Upon completion of the project, the organisation wants a thousand farmers from 25 other villages to follow this example project.

Through IUCN, the Turing Foundation will donate a total of € 44,000 to the project. see also: IUCN Nederland: other projects
harvesting manioc (cassava)
harvesting manioc (cassava)


ADEPAGODILIUCN Nederland Improved sustainable rice cultivation, Sangaréyah Bay, Guinée Bissau, 2010-2012
In Guinea-Bissau, local organisations ADEPAG and ODIL are collaborating to (re)introduce the sustainable cultivation of rice. Since the years of cheap, imported Asian rice are over, sustainable cultivation of rice is once again a good investment for farmers. Among other things, this project provides 50 hectares of new rice fields as well as trainings and education for engineers. Eventually, rice produce is supposed to increase to 200 tonnes and so generate a sixfold return on produce.

Through IUCN NL, the Turing Foundation will donate € 66,000 to the project. see also: IUCN Nederland: other projects
improved sustainable rice cultivation, Sangaréyah Bay, Guinée Bissau, 2010-2012
improved sustainable rice cultivation, Sangaréyah Bay, Guinée Bissau, 2010-2012


IUCN NederlandDONKO Sustainable management of wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali, 2010-2011
The Malinese organisation DONKO aims to improve the sustainable management of Lake Doro and the adjacent tidal areas in the province of Kayes, in the most Western part of Mali. This area is both economically and biologically of great importance. The project area has 9500 inhabitants, living in 8 villages: farmers, cattle breeding nomads and fishermen. In the previous phase of the project several crucial arrangements have been successfully laid down in management agreements with the many users of this area (amongst whom fishermen, farmers, shepherds and foresters). Moreover, investments have been made in sustainable vegetable cultivation, and in more sustainable fishing and forestation methods. The next phase of this project focuses on a further development of alternative sources of income for 300 women by the creation of vegetable gardens, reforestation of 26 hectares of land and by increasing the environmental awareness in school children.

In 2010, the Turing Foundation provides funding for this project via IUCN NL, donating € 33,000. see also:
      IUCN Nederland: other projects
      DONKO: other projects
      Other projects in focus country Mali
Vegetable gardens near the wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali
Vegetable gardens near the wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali


PARTSIUCN Nederland Ecosystem Management for the Murciellagos Bay, Philippines, 2007-2009
Murciellagos Bay is a breeding ground of important and diverse ecosystems. The bay covers 8,000 hectares and is home to rare and endangered fish, shellfish and sea turtle species. The area is threatened by pollution, overfishing and destructive fishing. The Philippine organisation PARTS (Partner for Rural & Technical Service) tries to have part of the coral reefs, mangrove forests and sea grass beds identified as Marine Protected Areas, so as to stop illegal fishing practices and encourage the recovery of the ecosystem and fish stock. The ambition is to achieve a sustainable balance between nature conservation and the local economy, for instance by strengthening the fishing organisations in most of the 24 local fishing villages, and by investing in nature education for the local community.

The Turing Foundation and IUCN Nederland will together contribute the sum of € 90,000 to this project, which runs until June 2009. see also: IUCN Nederland: other projects
Fishing village, Murciellagos Bay, The Philippines
Fishing village, Murciellagos Bay, The Philippines


NSLCIUCN Nederland Sustainable management of the biodiversity in the Lamit Bay, Philippines, 2007-2010
The Philippine organisation NSLC (Network of Sustainable Livelihoods Catalysts) is devoted to a sustainable conservation of Philippine nature. The rich biodiversity of Lamit Bay is threatened by commercial overfishing and dynamite fishing. The local community, dependent on fishing and on the cultivation of red seaweed, will cooperate in the protection of a network of 'no-take zones' covering 350 hectares (in the form of Marine Protected Areas). Expectations are that this protection of coral reefs, sea grass areas and mangrove forests will lead to the sustainable conservation of the entire bay (50,000 hectares). The training of the local community and the tapping of sustainable alternative sources of income play an essential role in this project.

The Turing Foundation and IUCN Nederland will together contribute € 88,000 towards the costs of the project until July 2010. see also: IUCN Nederland: other projects
10% improved coral cover measured in Lamit Bay at the end of the project (july 2010)
10% improved coral cover measured in Lamit Bay at the end of the project (july 2010)


African Parks Dungonab Bay and Sanganeb Atoll Marine National Park, Sudan, 2007-2009
African Parks helps African governments in managing, conserving and restoring seven National Parks. The foundation raises funds during the initial phase (sometimes lasting decades), sets up a financially sustainable park management and supports the economically sustainable development of the communities in and around the parks.

Sanganeb Atoll Marine National Park is the only Atoll in the Red Sea, located approximately 23 kilometres off the coast, near Port Sudan. Relatively unspoiled coral reefs can be found here, including the fauna associated with them. The park covers roughly 25 km2 (and 250 km2 including the buffer zone surrounding it). The area has been nominated twice to be added to the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Dungonab Bay National Park, located on the West coast of the Red Sea, consists of 800 km2 of coast, coral reefs and islands. The park offers a great diversity of habitats and animal species, amongst which important endangered species such as the Dugong. Two villages (one of which is Dungonab) are located within the park boundaries. The commitment of the population and their sustainable economic development therefore form a very important part of the management plan for the park.

During the coming five years, the Turing Foundation contributes € 1,000,000 to the protection and establishment of a sustainable management of these two national parks.

Update october 2008: Unfortunately African Parks Network has had to withdraw from Dungonab and Sanganeb Marine Parks in Sudan as a result of the lapsing of their initital three-year agreement.

The Turing Foundation contribution of € 100.000 in 2007 to the Parks in Sudan was largely invested in two important components of the project, namely infrastructure and capacity building. The field station was built near Mohammed Qol and will hopefully continue to be used for park management like field monitoring by the Sudanese authorities. Also the Turing Foundation invested in capacity building of staff. Some 18 rangers received training in car mechanics, welding techniques and electricity, first aid and fire fighting skills. Others received SCUBA training. These young staff members are now much better prepared for their future and hopefully they will be used in a manner that benefits their training.

The principal lesson learnt for African Parks is that it has reinforced their own approach in that they will not take on any future project unless Government commits to a full, long term mandate up front that allows them to manage the park.

The Turing Foundation understands and respects the withdrawal, and wishes to thank African Parks for the good cooperation and excellent reports we received during the project. Consequently the Turing Foundation withdraws its commitment of the remaining € 900.000, which was dependant on the conslusion of a new, long term agreement with the Governement of Sudan.

The Turing Foundation will continue to invest in other marineprojects to protect and sustain nurseries of the sea around the world. It is to be hoped that the numerous fish and very important coral reefs in the marine parks in Sudan can be preserved in the near future. see also:
      Donatie voor zeeparken in Soedan (Afrika Nieuws)
      Grant for African Parks from The Turing Foundation (APC)
      € 1 miljoen voor duurzame landbouw en ecosystemen in Afrika (persbericht)
Dungonab Bay Marine National Park
Dungonab Bay Marine National Park


DONKOIUCN Nederland Sustainable management of wetlands around Lake Doro, Mali, 2007-2009
IUCN Nederland joins forces with the Malinese organisation DONKO to coordinate the sustainable management of Lake Doro and adjacent tidal areas in South-West Mali. 9,500 people live in eight villages within the project region: farmers, cattle-breeding nomads and fishermen. Efforts are being made to make these people and the local authorities aware of the importance of sustainable nature conservation, and to help them to reach mutual agreements to that end. The people are supported in tapping alternative sources of income, for example by the contribution of material and knowledge in the field of sustainable vegetable growing, sustained fishing and tree planting.

The Turing Foundation finances this project, which runs until July 2009 (€ 44,000). see also:
      DONKO: other projects
      IUCN Nederland: other projects
      Other projects in focus country Mali
Sustainable vegetable growing
Sustainable vegetable growing