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Leprosy elimination - Archive


Below is a list of leprosy projects up to July 2007. An overview of recent projects can be found on our leprosy project page.

Older leprosy projects:
Leprosy in the spleen
January 2016
Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2015-2016
For many years the Turing Foundation has co-financed projects to combat leprosy with the... more

Leprosy in the spleen
January 2015
Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2014-2015
For many years the Turing Foundation has co-financed projects to combat leprosy with the... more

Taking bloodsamples for the IDEAL biobank
January 2014
IDEAL, early detection of leprosy: sample collection for biobanking and analysis of immune- and genetic host markers, 2014
The IDEAL Consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and... more

Workers in Cambodia are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Turing Foundation en Leprastichting, 2009)
October 2013
Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2012-2014
The Turing Foundation has been co-funding leprosy research projects with the Netherlands Leprosy... more

Skin infected with leprosy
March 2013
Research into macro- and micro-epidemiology of leprosy 2010-2013
The Leonard Wood Memorial Research Centre in Cebu, Philippines, is conducting research into the transmission... more

Taking bloodsamples for the IDEAL biobank
January 2013
IDEAL, continuation of sample collection for biobanking and pilot testing, 2013
The IDEAL Consortium (Initiative for Diagnostics and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) develops... more

immune biomarkers
January 2013
Research on identification of innate and adaptive immune biomarkers 2010-2013
This LUMC (Leiden University Medical Centre) research gives more insight into certain immune... more

Workers in Cambodia are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Turing Foundation en Leprastichting, 2009)
November 2012
Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2012
The Turing Foundation has been co-funding leprosy research projects with the Netherlands Leprosy... more

IDEAL - Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy
March 2012
IDEAL sample collection for biobanking, IDEAL (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy), 2012
The IDEAL consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and... more

IDEAL - Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy
October 2010
Main patron IDEAL consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) 2008-2010
This consortium of thirty Leprosy research groups will develop immunological tests in the coming years... more

Leprosy in the spleen
July 2010
Research on immunopathology of leprosy 2007-2011
The leprosy bacterium has a high affinity for Schwann cells - cells that form a protective layer around nerves... more

mycobacterium leprae
January 2010
Research on impact of preventive interventions on the transmission of M. Leprae, 2009-2010
The Erasmus University of Rotterdam and the KIT (Royal Tropical Institute) are together... more

Workers are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Cambodia 2009)
July 2009
Field Projects Leprosy Control, Cambodia 2009
The Leprosy Foundation works together with the CIOMAL organisation on Leprosy control in Cambodia. The quality of diagnostics is a... more

Leprosy Field Visit in Luang Namtha, Laos
July 2009
Field Projects Leprosy Control, Laos 2009
In Laos leprosy occurs mostly among minorities that are hard to reach. Mutilations are often severe and irreparable if the... more

Leprosy patients in the Kien Klean revalidation centre in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (Photo: Nicole Slootweg)
May 2008
Field Projects Leprosy Control, Cambodia 2008
The Leprosy Foundation works together with the CIOMAL organisation on Leprosy control in Cambodia. The quality of diagnostics is a... more

Leprosy control in Laos, 2008 (Photo Dr. Richard de Soldenhoff)
May 2008
Field Projects Leprosy Control, Laos 2008
In Laos leprosy occurs mostly among minorities that are hard to reach. Mutilations are often severe and irreparable if the... more

Leprosy Foundation, Nigeria, 2007
March 2007
Projects to cure leprosy 2007
The Dutch Leprosy Foundation invests all over the world in projects that help diagnose and cure people who suffer from leprosy... more

Milou Halbesma presents €1,000,000 to Kommer Braber, manager of the Leprosy Foundation
2006
€1.000.000 for the Dutch Leprosy Foundation, 2006-2007
The Dutch Leprosy Foundation has devoted itself for forty years to creating a world in which the permanent suffering, caused by leprosy, is no longer existent... more

Scientific Research
Leprastichting Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2015-2016
For many years the Turing Foundation has co-financed projects to combat leprosy with the Netherlands Leprosy Relief. In 2015 alone, the Turing Foundation contributed over €463.751 to projects like TENLEP, LUMC immunopathology, the Dutch Cancer Institute, and the Leonard Wood Memorial Research Center.

For this reason the Turing Foundation donated €23.118 directly to the Netherlands Leprosy Relief to cover its scientific research overheads over the past year. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy in the spleen
Leprosy in the spleen


Leprastichting Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2014-2015
For many years the Turing Foundation has co-financed projects to combat leprosy with the Netherlands Leprosy Relief. In 2014 alone, the Turing Foundation contributed over €350,000 to projects like TENLEP, LUMC immunopathology, the Dutch Cancer Institute, and the Leonard Wood Memorial Research Center.

For this reason the Turing Foundation donated €17,614 directly to the Netherlands Leprosy Relief to cover its scientific research overheads over the past year. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy in the spleen
Leprosy in the spleen


IDEALLUMCErasmus Universiteit Rotterdam IDEAL, early detection of leprosy: sample collection for biobanking and analysis of immune- and genetic host markers, 2014
The IDEAL Consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) is developing a new generation of tests to diagnose leprosy in an early stage. Since 2013, IDEAL has been collecting blood samples of leprosy patients and their household contacts in a biobank meant for future analysis of contamination, and transmission of the leprosy bacterium. In 2013, immunodiagnostics that were developed in an earlier phase of the IDEAL study have been developed further in the field. In 2014, apart from expanding the biobank, they will start on the analysis of the blood samples.

Over the past years, the Turing Foundation has already donated € 800,000 to the IDEAL study. In 2014, the foundation will contribute another € 155,000. see also:
      IDEAL: other projects
      LUMC: other projects
      Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam: other projects
Taking bloodsamples for the IDEAL biobank
Taking bloodsamples for the IDEAL biobank


Leprastichting Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2012-2014
The Turing Foundation has been co-funding leprosy research projects with the Netherlands Leprosy Relief for many years. Just this year, the Turing Foundation contributed about € 450.000 to such projects, matched euro-for-euro by the NLR. To judge the applications, we gratefully use the expertise of the CWO (the scientific advisory committee of the Netherlands Leprosy Relief).

The Turing Foundation has decided to donate € 40.000 to Netherlands Leprosy Relief itself, to help fund their overhead related to scientific research. Furthermore, the Turing will mark-up any future research projects shared with Netherlands Leprosy Relief by 5%. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Workers in Cambodia are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Turing Foundation en Leprastichting, 2009)
Workers in Cambodia are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Turing Foundation en Leprastichting, 2009)


Leonard Wood Memorial Research CenterLeprastichting Research into macro- and micro-epidemiology of leprosy 2010-2013
The Leonard Wood Memorial Research Centre in Cebu, Philippines, is conducting research into the transmission patterns of leprosy. In many areas, the transfer of leprosy seems to continue despite years of successful MDT (Multi-Drug Treatment) for lepers. The study's hypothesis is that effective leprosy control can be developed only with a better understanding of the transmission patterns within communities, and the identification of people with an increased risk of developing leprosy. Only then, interventions like chemoprofylaxe and/or immunoprofylaxe can be distributed properly and be cost-effective.

Main goal of the research is to map all known cases of leprosy in Cebu in both space and time, and add all new cases of leprosy to the database (macro-epidemiology). Then, the database should be expanded with the M.leprae strain typing within the clusters of the new cases (micro-epidemiology) to reach a better understanding of the disease's transmission patterns, its risk factors and the virulence patterns of the M.leprae strains. The detailed mapping of cases of leprosy combined with the strain typing that should enable the identification of transmission patterns within a properly demarcated area has never before been attempted.

The Turing Foundation will contribute € 118,500 to this long-range study (€ 43,000 of which will be donated in 2012). see also:
      Leonard Wood Memorial Research Center: other projects
      Leprastichting: other projects
Skin infected with leprosy
Skin infected with leprosy


IDEALLUMCErasmus Universiteit Rotterdam IDEAL, continuation of sample collection for biobanking and pilot testing, 2013
The IDEAL Consortium (Initiative for Diagnostics and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) develops immunological tests to detect leprosy infections at an early stage. In 2012, IDEAL has set up a biobank by collecting and storing samples, meant for future analysis of infection and transmission of the leprosy bacterium, and it has developed Diagnostic tests as well as tests for molecular epidemiology. In 2013, these tests will be developed further in the field, paving the way for an important next step in the research program that should lead to an effective preventive treatment of leprosy patients.

In 2012, the Turing Foundation will be contributing € 69,128 to the project. In the past, the Turing Foundation already contributed € 644,000 + € 90,000 to the IDEAL research project. see also:
      IDEAL: other projects
      LUMC: other projects
      Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam: other projects
Taking bloodsamples for the IDEAL biobank
Taking bloodsamples for the IDEAL biobank


LUMC Research on identification of innate and adaptive immune biomarkers 2010-2013
This LUMC (Leiden University Medical Centre) research gives more insight into certain immune pathological mechanisms. These new insights will shed light on the immunopathogenesis of leprosy and the leprosy reactions that lead to nerve damage. In such way strategies can be developed for the prevention and detection of nerve damage caused by leprosy.

Techniques for detecting and diagnosing leprosy in an early stage are of great importance for the prevention of nerve damage. To enable the early diagnoses and prediction of certain reactions, the LUMC research aims to gain more insight into the role different cell types - such as macrophages and T-cells (which have many different sub sets) and the signal substance they produce (such as cytokines)- play in the development of nerve damage in case of leprosy and leprosy reactions.

The LUMC research team is able to isolate and generate various types of these (new) human cellular sub sets, making it possible to study the processes that can lead to nerve damage elaborately. LUMC's theory is that the activation of certain cell types, such as the T-cells that play a role in inflammation diseases (so-called th17 cells) is a main element in this process. Too little is now known about the exact nature and working of these mechanisms, cell types and factors in the human body.

The Turing Foundation contributes a sum of € 260,000, which covers 50% of the research costs. The project runs until 2013. In 2013, the contribution is € 66.545; see also: LUMC: other projects
immune biomarkers
immune biomarkers


Leprastichting Donation to the leprosy research department of Netherlands Leprosy Relief, 2012
The Turing Foundation has been co-funding leprosy research projects with the Netherlands Leprosy Relief for many years. Just this year, the Turing Foundation contributed about € 450.000 to such projects, matched euro-for-euro by the NLR. To judge the applications, we gratefully use the expertise of the CWO (the scientific advisory committee of the Netherlands Leprosy Relief).

The Turing Foundation has decided to donate € 40.000 to Netherlands Leprosy Relief itself, to help fund their overhead related to scientific research. Furthermore, the Turing will mark-up any future research projects shared with Netherlands Leprosy Relief by 5%. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Workers in Cambodia are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Turing Foundation en Leprastichting, 2009)
Workers in Cambodia are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Turing Foundation en Leprastichting, 2009)


IDEAL IDEAL sample collection for biobanking, IDEAL (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy), 2012
The IDEAL consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) consists of all authoritative leprosy research groups in the world and is developing immunological tests in order to be able to diagnose leprosy infections at an early stage. The consortium is also working on molecular tests to gain a better insight into the transmission of leprosy bacteria. Eventually, the initiative wants to create tests that enable the detection and treatment of leprosy even before it has manifested itself. In 2012, IDEAL wants to collect and store samples to set up a biobank for the future analysis of biomarker profiles for the pathogen and protective immune response on M. leprae. In 2012, the Turing Foundation will contribute € 90,000 to the project. Previously, the Turing Foundation already donated € 644,000 to IDEAL's research. see also: IDEAL: other projects
IDEAL - Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy
IDEAL - Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy


IDEALKoninklijk Instutuut voor de Tropen Main patron IDEAL consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) 2008-2010
The IDEAL consortium (Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy) consists of thirty Leprosy research groups, half of which is established in countries where leprosy still occurs. All research groups have a background in laboratory research and/or research involving patients in the field. All major research groups in the world engaged in this branch of leprosy research are members of IDEAL.

The IDEAL consortium is oriented towards the development of immunological tests that can detect leprosy infections in an early stage. Apart from that, molecular tests are developed for gaining a better insight into the transmission of the leprosy bacterium. The ultimate goal is to find tests that can help prevent leprosy infections by the very early (before the illness has even manifested itself) diagnosis and treatment of leprosy.

The partners discuss the results of experiments, exchange experiences and information, provide materials and protocols from individual research projects and perform experiments after mutual consultation and in accordance with a testing format agreed upon. This streamlines and accelerates the research process, and yields quicker results for leprosy elimination.

Since the end of 2005, IDEAL has selected several candidates for both early diagnostics and transmission studies. A test will be developed between 2008 and 2010 that can critically identify leprosy infections in blood, and efforts will be made to enable the further identification of genetic markers on the leprosy bacterium. The markers can be used in transmission studies.

After 2010, IDEAL aims to start a large-scale research project on leprosy prevention through (tailor-made) prophylactic treatment of leper contacts.

The Turing Foundation contributes € 131,000 to this project in 2010. In total, the Turing Foundation contributes € 644,000 in the coming years (approx. 60% of the total project cost) towards the development of the above-mentioned tests. see also:
      Miljoen euro aan lepraonderzoek (Filanthropium)
      IDEAL: other projects
      Koninklijk Instutuut voor de Tropen: other projects
IDEAL - Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy
IDEAL - Initiative for Diagnostic and Epidemiological Assays for Leprosy


LUMCLeprastichting Research on immunopathology of leprosy 2007-2011
Leprosy is a contagious disease, caused by infection with a bacterium. This bacterium has a great affinity for, amongst others, Schwann cells - cells that form a protective layer around peripheral nerves. A team of the Leiden University Medical Centre conducts scientific research in order to gain a deeper insight into the processes that can lead to damages to Schwann cells and nerves - and to the related lifetime handicaps.

For some time now, an effective antibiotics cocktail treatment of the infection is possible. Some patients however show strong immune reactions to this treatment, which then still lead to irreparable nerve damages.

It is assumed that a leprosy bacterium within a Schwann cell is sometimes destroyed, and that small fragments (peptides) of this bacterium are presented by the Schwann cell to T-cells (defence cells). In certain circumstances, these T-lymphocytes can damage or even kill the Schwann cell. It is possible that this is one of the mechanisms involved in causing nerve damages as a result of leprosy. The LUMC-researchers think - on the basis of models originating from research on mice - that certain types of T-cells are important links in the process, but their exact nature and operations are as yet insufficiently known. The research focuses on thrashing out these immuno-pathological mechanisms, in hopes that the results can be used to develop new strategies for forecasting, tracing and preventing nerve damages as a result of leprosy.

The Turing Foundation contributes € 337,500 to this research, of which 75.000 in 2010. see also:
      Meer geld voor lepra onderzoek (Leprastichting)
      Turing Foundation financiert lepra-onderzoek in Leiden
      LUMC: other projects
      Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy in the spleen
Leprosy in the spleen


Erasmus Universiteit RotterdamKoninklijk Instutuut voor de Tropen Research on impact of preventive interventions on the transmission of M. Leprae, 2009-2010
The Erasmus University of Rotterdam and the KIT (Royal Tropical Institute) are together doing research into the transmission of the leprosy bacteria and the effects of prophylactic treatments.

Prophylactic treatment means that antibiotics are administered to people who do not (yet) suffer from leprosy. This can be compared to the prevention of malaria in travellers by prescribing medicine. In 2001, a research project started into the effects of prophylactic treatment of leprosy contacts on leprosy prevention. It is conducted in North Western Bangladesh. In the past six years all new leprosy cases, whether in- our outside the patient contact group, have been traced. It has been examined whether rifampicin leprosy occurred among the contact group. This appeared to be the case and even more so if the prophylactic treatment was combined with a BCG vaccine - which is today a standard vaccination for most children in the first year of their lives. During the current one year project, the research team aims, on the basis of information already available, to answer several questions related to the transmission of the leprosy bacteria and the success of prophylactic treatment.

The Turing Foundation pays 50% (€ 40,000) of the research costs of this project, which will take one year. see also:
      Turing Foundation schenkt € 1,1 miljoen aan nieuw lepraonderzoek
      Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam: other projects
      Koninklijk Instutuut voor de Tropen: other projects
mycobacterium leprae
mycobacterium leprae



Recovery Programs for Leprosy Patients
CIOMALLeprastichting Field Projects Leprosy Control, Cambodia 2009
The Leprosy Foundation works together with the CIOMAL organisation on Leprosy control in Cambodia. There the Leprosy Foundation focuses primarily on improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment, technical supervision and program management.

In 2009 the Turing Foundation again contributes € 50,000 to the field programs of the Leprosy Foundation in Cambodia. see also:
      CIOMAL: other projects
      Leprastichting: other projects
Workers are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Cambodia 2009)
Workers are being trained in recognizing and preventing leprosy (Cambodia 2009)


Leprastichting Field Projects Leprosy Control, Laos 2009
In the Lao People's Democratic Republic leprosy mainly occurs among minorities that are often hard to reach. Contamination is usually discovered only in a late stage, when mutilations are already severe and irreparable. One of the things the Leprosy Foundation devotes itself to in Laos is better registration and medical guidance of leprosy patients, examination of people whom leprosy patients have been in contact with, and trainings and courses for local health workers.

Update 2010: In 2009 the Turing Foundation again contributed € 50,000 to the field programs of the Leprosy Foundation in Laos. Because of local irregularities, the Leprosy Foundation has had to put the project on hold and has returned the donation. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy Field Visit in Luang Namtha, Laos
Leprosy Field Visit in Luang Namtha, Laos


CIOMALLeprastichting Field Projects Leprosy Control, Cambodia 2008
The Leprosy Foundation works together with the CIOMAL organisation on Leprosy control in Cambodia. There the Leprosy Foundation focuses primarily on improving the quality of diagnostics, treatment, technical supervision and program management.

In 2008 the Turing Foundation contributes € 50,000 to the field programs of the Leprosy Foundation in Cambodia. see also:
      CIOMAL: other projects
      Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy patients in the Kien Klean revalidation centre in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (Photo: Nicole Slootweg)
Leprosy patients in the Kien Klean revalidation centre in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (Photo: Nicole Slootweg)


Leprastichting Field Projects Leprosy Control, Laos 2008
In the Lao People's Democratic Republic leprosy mainly occurs among minorities that are often hard to reach. Contamination is usually discovered only in a late stage, when mutilations are already severe and irreparable. One of the things the Leprosy Foundation devotes itself to in Laos is better registration and medical guidance of leprosy patients, examination of people whom leprosy patients have been in contact with, and trainings and courses for local health workers.

In 2008 the Turing Foundation contributes € 50,000 to the activities of the Leprosy Foundation in Laos. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy control in Laos, 2008 (Photo Dr. Richard de Soldenhoff)
Leprosy control in Laos, 2008 (Photo Dr. Richard de Soldenhoff)


Leprastichting Projects to cure leprosy 2007
The Dutch Leprosy Foundation invests all over the world in projects that help diagnose and cure people who suffer from leprosy: Angola, Bolivia, Brazil, Cambodia, the Carribian, China, Ethiopia, Gambia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Madagascar, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Surinam, Thailand, Vietnam and Zambia.

In 2007 the Turing Foundation contributes € 100.000,- in supports of these projects. see also: Leprastichting: other projects
Leprosy Foundation, Nigeria, 2007
Leprosy Foundation, Nigeria, 2007


Leprastichting €1.000.000 for the Dutch Leprosy Foundation, 2006-2007
The Dutch Leprosy Foundation has devoted itself for forty years to creating a world in which the permanent suffering, caused by leprosy, is no longer existent and is finally eradicated.

The Turing Foundation recognizes the dedication and the expertise of the Leprosy Foundation and saw such like-mindedness in their objectives that it decided to donate € 1.000.000,-. see also:
      Geelen schenkt 1 miljoen aan Leprastichting (Filanthropium)
      Donatie van € 1.000.000,- voor de Leprastichting (Fondenwerving)/2007-03-01
      Leprastichting: other projects
Milou Halbesma presents €1,000,000 to Kommer Braber, manager of the Leprosy Foundation
Milou Halbesma presents €1,000,000 to Kommer Braber, manager of the Leprosy Foundation